IETF Medical Advisory Board Member on TED

Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias photo

Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias

TED, a nonprofit devoted to “Ideas Worth Spreading”, brings the world’s most captivating speakers to the masses through short, prepared talks covering today’s cutting edge technology, entertainment, and design topics. The TED conference recently visited Charlottesville, VA, where IETF Medical Advisory Board member, Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias, discussed his work on the Focused Ultrasound research study for essential tremor.

As Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia,Dr. Elias has led a number of research investigations. In 2011, his team became the first in the world to successfully treat a person with disabling [essential] tremor using focused ultrasound that was guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This procedure and subsequent clinical trials have resulted in an outpouring around the globe of investigations using ultrasound interventions to treat disorders of the brain. ¹

In his presentation, Dr. Elias shared his study results along with a message of the importance of research to further scientific advances.

Watch the taped presentation. Dr. Elias is the second to the last speaker (click on the timeline at approximately 08:30.00 to get right to his section).

¹[Unattributed] TEDx, http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/8358. Nov.15, 2013.

DARPA Focuses on DBS

DBS

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical treatment involving the implantation of a medical device called a brain pacemaker, which sends electrical impulses to specific parts of the brain.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is the agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new, advanced technologies in order to maintain the technological superiority of the U.S. military. DARPA recently announced that it will commit $70 million over the next five years to the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative. More specifically, to further investigate Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery is an FDA-approved treatment that has been proven to significantly reduce the tremor associated with ET. In DBS surgery, a wire (electrode or lead) is placed in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus, located deep in the brain. The wire connects under the skin to a pacemaker-like device in the chest, which provides mild electrical currents to control symptoms. In ET, DBS of the VIM nucleus of the thalamus is the most commonly used surgical procedure to control tremor.

Advances in technology have now opened up this option for other complex conditions such as depression, which is precisely why DARPA is so interested in the technology.  According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 10% to 18% of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) troops are likely to have PTSD after they return from service.  That is a significant number of men and women who may require treatment.

So what does this initiative mean for those affected by essential tremor? DARPA would like to see DBS go further than just treat symptoms. “There is no technology that can acquire signals that can tell them precisely what is going on with the brain,” says Justin Sanchez, DARPA program manager, to The New York Times. He explained that DARPA is “trying to change the game on how we approach these problems.”

DARPA hopes to develop DBS to the point that the device will be able to monitor brain signals in real time, treat illness accordingly and measure the success of that treatment. This would be a real games changer for ET patients suffering from severe tremor symptoms. Imagine never having to turn the DBS device on or off, or have it calibrated. It would be programed to know exactly how to manage individual tremor symptoms, then evaluate the results and make adjustments accordingly.

Only time will tell if DARPA is successful with this ambitious project. But even if all their goals are not realized, they are bound to discover an abundance of new information about how the brain works.

Learn more about BRAIN.