Three new IETF-funded research projects announced

Research-Appeal-2015-Facebook-CoverEach year researchers with an interest in studying the various aspects of essential tremor are encouraged to submit scientific proposals for grant funding from the IETF. To date, your research donations have provided nearly $1 million to fund numerous promising studies. This year, the IETF will fund three essential tremor research grants totaling $80,000. Grant funding was provided to the IETF from donors, people directly affected by this life-altering condition, like you.

The IETF will award $35,000 to the study entitled “Testing the GABA Nucleo-Olivary Hypothesis of Essential Tremor.” The goal of this research is to systematically test whether impaired function or degeneration of GABAergic N-O neurons induces action tremor, supporting the hypothesis that such mechanisms underlie at least some cases of ET. Read more…

The second study to be awarded $20,000 from the IETF is “Essential Tremor Research Program: Cannabidiol Anti-Tremor Action and Mechanisms.” This research will explore the effects of a particular cannabinoid known as “CBD” (cannabidiol) on ET. Unlike the well-known cannabinoid “THC” (tetrahydrocannabinol), which has mood-altering effects, CBD does not impact mood. CBD has already shown some promising initial results in the treatment of epilepsy, pain, anxiety, and other disorders. Read more…

The final study, “Abnormal Climbing Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses in Essential Tremor” will be awarded $25,000. This study will be conducted by Dr. Sheng-Han Kuo, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Columbia University in New York. Dr. Kuo’s team will build upon previous research after discovering an unknown abnormality in essential tremor patients at the location in the brain where the neuron’s electrical and chemical signals are transmitted and received. Read more…

Your research donation could make the difference between critical research being funded, or being turned away. Every donation, no matter the size, counts. Help us keep research moving forward! Make a research donation today and learn more about IETF-funded research.

New, exciting changes for DBS patients

Activa PC+SResearchers at the University of Washington are developing a new device to help monitor and record tremor changes in Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) patients. With the new Activa PC+S device, developed by Medtronic, stimulation can be turned on and off, leading to battery conservation of the device — an issue for current DBS technology. A person with essential tremor could detect their tremor and adjust the stimulation within clinician set limits.

The Medtronic Activa PC+S sits in the chest with electrodes, electrical conductors that make contact with a nonmetallic part of the circuit, wired into the brain. The electrode doesn’t have to be used to stimulate but since it is present, it can still be used to record tremor to later analyze for adjustments, if needed.

Researchers are also developing an Android smartwatch app to communicate with the piece of hardware from smartphones and smartwatches. When the patient senses the tremor, they can enable stimulation and modify within parameters in real time without a computer or without visiting their physician.

This device is not yet FDA-approved and still in early research stages. For more information visit, The Daily.