ET Will Not Prevent Me from Achieving My Goals

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four college scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our spring 2018 scholarship recipients.

By Kelley Cordeiro
Doctoral Student at Molloy College
Rockville Centre, NY

How has essential tremor affected my life? I could answer this question by describing the challenges it creates trying to control my trembling hands with even the smallest tasks, like threading a needle, counting out change, applying makeup, typing, or measuring ingredients, just to name a few. I could talk about how much I notice my tremor at the end of a long day, when I try to unwind by reading a book or watching television, but I have to concentrate on trying to keep my head still. This becomes even more difficult when my head trembles on my pillow at night, making relaxation and sleep a conscious effort, and often an elusive goal.

I might answer that having ET has caused me to answer questions for my children about why I am shaking, why grandma shakes too, or the most difficult question, “will I shake like that when I grow up?”

There are so many possible ways to answer the question of how ET has affected my life. My favorite answer is that is has NOT affected my life. I am the mother of three wonderful children. I chose a mid-life career change to afford me the opportunity to be a stay-at-home mom, but also involved returning to school at an advanced age. I completed my master’s degree in a new field with a 4.0 GPA. I am now pursuing my doctorate degree in the field of education, with the goal of being an agent of change in diverse learning communities.

I take on extra teaching opportunities to help cover the costs of my tuition, which increases my stress level, which increases my tremor, but which is not an excuse I am willing to let stand in my way, or prevent me from achieving my goals.

Will my children develop a tremor as they grow up? What is the best way to answer this question for my children? Research indicates that there is a strong chance that they may develop this familial condition. So, when I respond to my children I want to give them an honest answer, supported by the evidence of my example: Yes, you may develop essential tremor, but it doesn’t have to affect your life!

I want to thank the IETF for the opportunity to be considered for a scholarship, which can help me achieve my educational goals. I would like to say that ET has not affected my life, but the IETF has!

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The deadline for fall 2018 scholarship applications is May 1, 2018. Application information is available on the IETF website. Interested in supporting students with ET during their educational journey? You can donate online.

 

Are Essential Tremor and Parkinson’s Connected?

It’s a common misdiagnosis. Someone notices a tremor in their hands or body and automatically they think they have Parkinson’s disease. Some have said their doctor prescribed a Parkinson’s disease medication for them until they discovered the correct diagnosis was essential tremor (ET). And sometimes a person is diagnosed with ET when they are actually in the early stages of Parkinson’s.

Parkinson’s disease and ET will always be connected because of their similar physical symptoms. There is more public awareness about Parkinson’s, but ET is eight times more common. At the International Essential Tremor Foundation, we hear from individuals who have both conditions.

So what are the differences? How can you learn more? One way is to take part in the IETF’s upcoming FREE teleconference, “ET vs. Parkinson’s: How Do They Differ?” Mark your calendar to join us:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2018
12 p.m. pacific time
1 p.m. mountain time
2 p.m. central time
3 p.m. eastern time

Teleconference Speaker
Dr. Holly Shill

Dr. Holly Shill, chair of the IETF medical advisory board, will be the teleconference speaker. Dr. Shill is the director of the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix. Her expertise includes the diagnosis and treatment of involuntary movements, essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, dystonia, and ataxia. IETF Executive Director Patrick McCartney will be the teleconference moderator.

How Can You Participate in the Teleconference?
If you’ve never participated in a teleconference before, don’t worry, it’s easy! The entire conference is conducted over the phone; no internet or computer is required. You can listen in by yourself, or host a teleconference party in your home and put us on speaker phone. (Then you can have your own group discussion afterward!)

But first, give us a call, 1-888-387-3667, or go online to register. Reservations are required because our capacity for callers is limited. When you register, you’ll receive a call in number and conference code. And, you’ll have the opportunity to give us a question or two that you would like to have answered during the teleconference. Here are a few questions that have already been submitted:

  • Is Parkinson’s more in the feet and ET in the hands?
  • Does ET and/or Parkinson’s affect your memory?
  • What percentage of people with ET develop Parkinson’s?

Our Past Teleconferences Are Online
The IETF conducts several teleconferences each year as part of its educational offering to people with essential tremor. All teleconferences are recorded and posted on our website so anyone can log on anytime to listen to past ones.

We also host educational forums several times a year in cities throughout the U.S. Our next forum is scheduled for June 23, 2018 in Minneapolis. You can read more about this online.

The IETF’s goal is to provide hope to the essential tremor community through awareness, education, support, and research. These teleconferences are one way we carry out the “education” part of our mission.

We know that by providing educational programs, we can continue to communicate the latest information about essential tremor. Join us on April 18!