Oh Lord, Please Take This Tremor from Me!

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others and share your comments and words of encouragement.

By Anna,

I first noticed I had a head tremor when I was approximately 10 years old. I remember people would ask me why I was shaking and I really didn’t know. And at that age, I didn’t seem to care that much as it didn’t happen that often. I actually blamed it on a neighbor pushing me out of a tree when I was around that age. I thought I had jolted something out of position. My dad didn’t have his tremor yet as it only came on for him when he was well into his 60s.

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As I got older and into high school, the tremors seemed much more frequent. But as long as I kept moving (didn’t stay still) they weren’t noticeable. So I began vigorously shaking my leg when I sat still, especially in school. I remember my teacher asking my mom if I did drugs. My mom just said “she’s a bit anxious” which also was true. The hardest part was feeling out of control and not really knowing why.

After I graduated and found out I actually had essential tremor I decided to try some different medications to see if I could calm it a bit. I tried gabapentin, topiramate, propranolol and primidone but none of them were worth the side effects they brought on. I even tried Botox injections in my neck but after all the pain and the money, I felt no relief. I started taking antidepressants in my early 30s which helped me deal with the tremors a bit better than without them.

Into my 40s, I found out about Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery and from then on I was on a mission. You see, I was starting to become an introvert. I hated going anywhere where I had to sit still. I had three beautiful children and worked full time at a bank and as long as I could move a bit I could camouflage the shaking. Honestly, I think it was way more pronounced in my own thoughts than it actually was outwardly. But that didn’t matter. To me, I was a freak and I couldn’t stand the thought of people looking at me and either wondering what was wrong or feeling sorry for me. It was really hard to concentrate or focus.

“I can’t count the number of times people asked me if I was cold and I would say yes just because I didn’t want to attempt the ET story and have them feel bad for asking.”

Whenever my bank manager called a meeting, which was almost daily, I literally felt sick to my stomach because I WAS IN THE DREADFUL SITUATION OF TRYING TO SIT STILL AGAIN. And it was actually physically painful because the more I tried to sit still, the harder it was. It was like an internal/external battlefield and all I wanted to do was fall asleep and be still.

The dentist was just as bad or worse. And the time I had a small precancerous spot removed from my forehead was absolutely horrifying because the nurse could not hold me still while the doctor cut me. I even stopped going to church, which I only started in my 30s, but was enjoying. I do remember praying, “Oh Lord, please take this tremor from me!”

Well, in 2006 my prayers were answered! I got my double Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery. It worked! I was over the moon. I had to get my chest opened again in 2011 and 2016 to get new batteries, which as fine. In 2018, I needed new batteries again and I noticed my tremor coming back quite a bit. From 2006 until 2016 whenever I noticed my tremor creeping back, I would just turn up my stimulators and I was pretty much still again. But the downfall in turning them up was that the wires implanted in my brain were so close to my speech center that every time I turned them up it would be a little harder to talk. Unfortunately now, 13 years later, I sound like I have a speech impediment and it is a chore to talk. But don’t get me wrong, I will NEVER regret the surgery and I will take the speech issue over the tremors any day.

Now I’m hoping and praying to get the new focused ultrasound surgery. I am always positively searching for a better quality of life. So my advice to anyone else suffering with ET is: do what feels best for you. The DBS was an absolute godsend for me and gave me 12-13 years and it’s still not bad, but if the new surgery can help my speech and I am eligible, that will be my next quest. I want to live my best life.

ADA Accommodation and DBS Therapy Provide Support for Fred

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others.

Fred’s Story

Fred was diagnosed with essential tremor (ET) at the age of 62. That was just two years ago, and yet he has had tremors since he was a teenager. His grandfather had ET it and his sister has it. He said they all have always just adapted the best they could.

Unlike many people afflicted with ET, Fred didn’t let it stop him from going out to dinner, even though he couldn’t get a spoon of corn or peas to his mouth without spilling them. He remembers going through the buffet line at his nephew’s wedding and struggling to serve himself because of his trembling hands. Though he admits that his handwriting has never been good, it finally became so illegible that even HE couldn’t read it.

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“Taking communion at church got harder and harder,” he recalled. “And fine detail work, such as holding very small screws, became impossible.”

Fred applied for “reasonable accommodation” at work, where he is a water treatment operator. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employers are required to provide “reasonable accommodations” to qualified employees with disabilities. It gave him a sense of relief to know others were aware of his condition and that they would provide accommodations to support him in his work.

Through the years, Fred said what helped him cope the most with his ET was his faith and becoming comfortable enough to accept his tremor. He also sought support through the IETF’s Essential Tremor Awareness Group on Facebook.

“When you hear what other people with ET are going through, it kind of relieves the frustration you are going through,” he said.

Medication has never provided him much relief, and like many others, Fred saw his ET worsen with age. He got to the point where he knew he had to do something to get relief. So he went online and did some research on surgical options, then visited with his neurologist about Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy. After learning he was a good candidate, he underwent surgery a year ago. Today he said he has his life back.

DBS therapy involves electrical stimulation to the brain through an electrode planted deep in the VIM (ventralis intermedius) nucleus of the brain called the thalamus. The implanted electrode is connected to a neurostimulator (battery) which provides the appropriate amount of electrical stimulation to control the tremor.

Today there are still times when Fred shakes a little, but not to the degree he did in the past. A small, but important thing he can do now, is serve his wife a cup of coffee.

“I’m excited to tell people about my ability to manage my tremor through DBS. There is hope out there,” he said.

Her Acceptance of ET Built Her Confidence and Brought Empowerment

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others.

Rachel’s Story.

Essential tremor (ET) is not just a condition of the elderly. Rachel is proof of that. She is only 28 years old and she has had ET since she was five.

Young but wise beyond her years, Rachel has come to terms with her ET and that acceptance has helped her.

“If you don’t accept yourself as a person with a disability and you just are negative about it and say, ‘this is it. I can’t do anything,’ then you are letting life and time pass you by,” she said. “But if you actually accept it and have that confidence and use it to your ability as a way of empowerment, then it’s something that makes life and time a lot easier.”

Rachel has made it a priority to raise awareness about ET. As a communication major in college, she used ET as her platform when she gave speeches and produced videos. She captured ET through photography and worked on individual and group projects. She saw it as an opportunity to let people know that ET exists and explained the impact it has on people of all ages. She even agreed to be the subject of a documentary film her friend Debra produced. Titled, ShakeItUp! it can still be viewed online today through YouTube.

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But, Rachel didn’t stop there. She went on to reach out to people all over the world through Facebook support groups, and maintains a presence in more than 30 groups today. She started a blog where she wrote about ET, and her social media posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter frequently mentioned her challenges and struggles. More than anything, she focused on helping people understand what ET is.

“People know what Parkinson’s disease is so I use that as a point of reference to say, if you know what a resting tremor is with Parkinson’s, then think about the reverse of that. ET is the action tremor,” she explained.

Rachel became co-leader of an essential tremor support group in her community and then took the reins as leader when her co-leader moved.

She estimates she has reached over a thousand people through her awareness efforts.

“I try to take any opportunity I can to be able to share my story,” Rachel said. “It also helps me. It’s a form of talk therapy and you never know who you are reaching.”

My Shaking Made Me Feel Like I Was ‘Going Nuts!’

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others.

By Jody,

My tremors started when I was 21. My daughter was almost one-year-old when I noticed my head feeling like it was shaking inside but not noticeable to others. I went to my regular doctor and said, “I think I’m going nuts… I feel my head shaking and it’s not stopping.”

My doctor sent me to a neurologist who tested me and I got the diagnosis of tremors. At that time it was just my head shaking; but it went from not noticeable to others to very noticeable within six months. I was prescribed an anti-seizure medication.

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Then I also started doing my own research on essential tremor. My mother-in-law saw an older lady in the hospital waiting room one day and noticed she shook just like me. She started talking to her and found out her doctor prescribed Botox injections. So I made an appointment with that doctor who diagnosed me with both essential tremor and muscular dystonia. She prescribed many different medications including muscle relaxers, and most of the medications had bad side effects.

After a few years I started Myobloc injections. Those worked for about nine years. I then went to the Mayo Clinic to explore the option of DBS surgery but decided against it.

I went a few years without seeing a doctor then found another specialist. We again started the process of trying to find a medication that would help relieve my tremors. Today I have exhausted all of the medications out there that they use to treat tremors.

“Over the 20 years of me having this I now have tremors throughout my whole body. My head shakes, shoulders, trunk down to my legs. I do not stop shaking at all.”

I am now doing Botox under an orthopedic specialist. I also see a chiropractor and use CBD oil when the Botox runs out of my system.

I work in an office setting full time and have a cleaning business on the side so I work seven days a week. In my office job we have changed a few things to help me get along easier. I have been at this job for 22 years so they have seen the tremors progress with me as the years have gone by. I use weighted pens and pencils. I have a standing desk now so I can move around as much as I need to. I feel better the more I can move. If I’m not working and just laying around at home I hurt – my muscles hurt, my body hurts. But, I can still move. Some days are harder than others. Writing is getting harder.

I’m amazed at how many people have had this condition their whole life. I sometimes have to remind myself of the people who can’t work or can’t write at all because of their tremors. Mine are bad but others have them much worse than me.

Go to a Doctor Who Listens and Believes in You

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others.

NETA month 2019 LogoBy Lucy,

Gradual, insidious, and nasty are three words that I use to describe essential tremor (ET). I am an 84-year-old widow with ET everywhere. I am also hearing impaired and my speech is affected. I wanted to share my story to try to help others. I think the biggest misconception about ET is the general belief that it is a little condition for the aged, which is merely an inconvenience.

I am a retired junior high teacher and it was actually one of my students who made me pay attention to my shaky right hand. I knew I was shaking but I guess, like many others, I tried to ignore it. This was in the 1980s.

I asked my general practice doctor about my shaking. He just smiled and said, “You don’t have Parkinson’s disease.” But he didn’t give me a diagnosis or any treatment suggestions.

My tremor remained static for a few years. Then when I retired in 1995 it had moved to my right leg as well, but was not too noticeable. In fact, when my husband passed away in 1999, he was not aware of it. But, then it began to worsen.

I began doing some research online and disagreed with my doctor. I was sure I had essential tremor. He finally sent me to Akron Hospital and after some tests they said I was correct, but still no one suggested treatments, medications, or advice. I tried weighted eating utensils, but didn’t have much luck.

Soon shaking began in my arm and leg on my left side. I had given up my volunteer work with Hospice and concentrated on my hobbies: reading, tatting, needlework, and piano. I found myself withdrawing from any public functions and depression set in. The doctor gave me medications for depression and it helped some. Soon I quit cooking and got Meals on Wheels and used my microwave. My favorite coping method was spending time with my faithful companions, a cat and dog, and my Christian faith. My church still keeps in touch today.

In 2010 I just about wrecked my car when my arm spasmed. So I parked my car and called my kids. In a couple of months I was safely moved 130 miles away with my youngest daughter who is a trained caregiver. (My older daughter lives in Australia and my son in Texas.)

We have conducted some background research on our family and have found my niece is sure she has ET and my granddaughter, too. We think my father and sister did as well.

Since I moved I have a general practice doctor who believes me. He referred us to Wexner Medical Center (at the Ohio State University). I have officially been diagnosed with ET and almost had Deep Brain Stimulation surgery, but I decided not to. It just didn’t “feel” right.

I am on medication now but I don’t think anything is helping much. I am looking into the new MRI treatment since it is conducted nearby.

My advice to anyone who thinks they have essential tremor is to find a recognized specialist who listens and believes in you. Also, get involved in helping. I can’t do much now but when I die my brain goes to Yale for ET research.

P.S. It took me nearly four hours to type this.

Custom-Fitted Glove Can Help Manage Essential Tremor

From time to time we like to feature products or techniques that can help people manage or better cope with their essential tremor. Here is occupational therapist Krista Madere’s story of inventing the Readi-Steadi Glove System.

By Krista Madere, LOTR, CHT, Steadi, LLC

Krista Madere photo for blog

Passionate about my career as a registered occupational therapist and certified hand therapist for 21 years, I challenged myself to find a way to help clients gain control of their hand tremors in all aspects of daily living.

I personally watched my grandfather, a graphic artist in New York City, suffer from the debilitating effects of hand tremors, including social withdrawal. 

In the work that I do, I had seen many adaptive devices on the market, such as weighted utensils and modified pens. Most were created to help with a specific task, such as writing or eating, but not both. I wanted to recommend something to my patients that could be versatile enough to work for a variety of tasks.  

With all this in mind, I designed the Readi-Steadi® glove. This customized glove helps reduce both resting and action hand tremors, and has proven to reduce tremors by as much as 50%.  Customers have rated it as comfortable and easy to maintain. It weighs less than one pound, and does not restrict range of motion. Probably the best part: there are no side effects!  

Readi-Steadi® has already helped hundreds of people regain their confidence enjoying life again! One franchise owner from New Orleans, diagnosed with essential tremor, opted for a custom Readi-Steadi® system. Since then, he has mastered the art of time management and can control his hand and arm tremors without adverse side effects.  Excitedly, he no longer has to order drinks “with wiggle room” and can manage lightweight paper and plastic products when on the go.

Currently, I offer in person custom-fittings in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana clinic, but modern technology has allowed me the ability to offer online assessments and custom-fittings through the website, www.readi-steadi.com.

Most major insurances are accepted and individual policies and benefits are verified by our billing manager, Sheryl, prior to appointment and fabrication.  

Look for more information on our website or email or call me at: info@readi-steadi.com, 225-614-2631. I’m excited to get you started on the road to a better life by helping you manage your tremor.

Being ‘Mindful’ May Help in Managing Essential Tremor

By Dr. Michael Braitsch, PT, DPT
Tribe Wellness, LLC

Photo of Michael Braitsch, Tribe WellnessIf you’re like me, you’ve heard over and over again the value of mindfulness. It’s become quite a popular buzzword in a variety of manners of marketing. As we enter the next frontier of neuroscience and brain health, it seems like you can’t go anywhere without hearing about mindfulness. But what does mindfulness really mean and how can it be useful in daily life or in managing life with a tremor?

As a physical therapist, I have seen time and again the role of increased stress ramping up the severity of a patient’s symptoms (whether it be chronic pain in someone’s lower back, the amplitude or frequency of a tremor, the incidence of freezing gait in someone with Parkinson’s disease – the  list goes on).

I’ve met many people though with an essential tremor who usually say something like, “If I really focus on it, I can kind of calm my tremor down.” This is mindfulness!

The even better news is that practicing mindfulness can have far reaching benefits to improve quality of life with or without a tremor. It makes good sense. When we are calmer, we learn better, we perform better, we are less distracted, and we can even tap into a level of subconscious skill to make life easier.

While this all sounds great, I’m also here to warn you that it takes some effort and consistency; however, we all know that most worthwhile things in life take some effort. The intention of this blog post is to clarify what mindfulness practice is and how it could be helpful.

What is Mindfulness?
Many people consider the practice of mindfulness as simply, being aware of the present moment and the task-at-hand. Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines mindfulness as:

“1 : the quality or state of being mindful

2 : the practice of maintaining a nonjudgmental state of heightened or complete awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis “

So “mindfulness” is really a practice. It’s NOT a destination. It has a lot of similarities with meditation or directed thinking which is common in all religious beliefs, to quiet the mind you don’t have to run off to the mountains or join a monastery. Rather, mindfulness provides a method of intentionally directing one’s focus to the task-at-hand, while avoiding judgment (both good and bad).

Let’s break each of these down further.

Focus on the Present
An increased focus on the present moment is a heightened commitment to directing one’s attention to the task-at-hand. Even though the mind may wander, coming back to the present is the key for mindfulness. We are all human beings and have a natural tendency to consciously or unconsciously drift into other thoughts, but coming back to “right now” is the goal of this practice. Oddly enough, in a world where multi-tasking is everywhere, mindfulness practices teach us that we are more effective and more efficient when we slow down and focus on what we are doing.

Be Non-Judgmental
Each day we make thousands of decisions. For the sake of survival of the species, we have an evolutionary drive to constantly judge things as good or bad, helpful or harmful, useful or a waste of time. Using our “fight or flight” response has served us tremendously for thousands of years. This is often the hardest part of mindfulness. Reinforcement of use of the “fight or flight” hardwires us to rush ahead to the next moment. However, when we lose sight of the present and constantly let the mind race, neuroscience tells us that we strengthen our brains’ stress responses to everyday tasks. On an extreme level, a heightened stress-response can have far-reaching negative effects. While it’s helped humanity to survive, we’ve become hardwired to get bogged down by incessant mental chatter. Mindfulness shows us that we can remain focused on the task at hand without judgment, and on a very practical level, rewiring our brains from training a ”stress-response,” to instead, training a “relaxation response.”

As we strive to increase our focus and to quiet the mind, we can find an abundance of benefits from improved awareness. We can even gain insight into why we feel a certain way or perhaps a deeper level of relaxation. This training has a powerful effect on our autonomic nervous system. By choosing presence and mindfulness, a hyperactive brain or a hyperactive nervous system can be slowed down, leading to a wealth of benefits including improved cardiovascular health, improved cognition, and more!

But What About My Tremor?
Managing stress is great for everyone. For someone with a tremor, it can be even more helpful. Most people I’ve met who are dealing with essential tremor say something like, “my tremor gets worse when I’m stressed out.” Stress and depression can even create a negative cycle that increases the tremor currently, and because of embarrassment about worsening of the tremor, causes more stress and depression. While there have not yet been studies on practicing mindfulness as a means of managing essential tremor, there have been many anecdotal reports of it helping. It stands to reason that even if mindfulness did nothing for the tremor itself, the already established far-reaching benefits make it worth the effort until a study can show what so many people have already reported. Why not give yourself a chance to reduce stress and feel good, right?

Can I Practice Mindfulness While Exercising?
Now for my favorite topic. . .there are forms of exercise that harness and foster a mindful approach while also striving to calm the mind and strengthen the body. As a physical therapist, my life’s mission is to help people move better and feel better. The research on the role of exercise in managing stress is abundant to say the least. As a long-time martial artist, I’ve seen first-hand the changes that can occur with dedicated practice of martial arts and the increased sense of well-being that students develop. Tai Chi is easily the most common form of martial art with emphasis on mindful practice because it is low-impact, easy to modify, and because it focuses on breath with movement. Alternatively, yoga has provided an avenue for mindful training for centuries and pilates also employs a mindful approach to movement, capturing the benefits of mindfulness and exercise.

What Else Can I Look at to Learn More?
Mindfulness resources are everywhere! There is no shortage of resources when it comes to mindfulness. The best practice though, like the best exercise, is the one that you can do consistently.

Here are a few to start with:

 

Wrapping Your Mind Around Head Tremor

(This is an article from a past issue of Tremor Talk magazine. It’s just a sampling of the stories we include in each issue. Annual donors to the IETF receive Tremor Talk magazine in the mail three times per year.)

By Arif Dalvi, MD, MBA
Director of the Comprehensive Movement Disorders Program
Palm Beach Neuroscience Institute 

Dr. Arif DalviThe term tremor refers to an involuntary shaking of any part of the body. While tremor in the hands is most common, head tremor can also occur. In patients with essential tremor, head tremor can be an isolated symptom or may occur in combination with hand tremor. Essential tremor is by far the most common cause of head tremor. Another cause is cervical dystonia, also known as spasmodic torticollis. Head tremor may also occur in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Stroke, head injury, and multiple sclerosis are other causes of tremor but are less likely to cause head tremor.

Hyperexcitability and rhythmic activity in the circuits of the brain are believed to be the underlying mechanism for tremor. One such circuit includes three areas deep in the brain called the red nucleus, the inferior olivary nucleus (ION), and the dentate nucleus. This circuit is responsible for fine-tuning voluntary movements. Proper function prevents any undershoot or overshoot of movements. An abnormal response in this circuit, especially within the ION, can lead to tremor.

Approximately 95 percent of patients with essential tremor present with hand tremor. However, about 35 percent of patients have head tremor either by itself or in conjunction with hand tremor. Some patients also have voice tremor. Hand tremor occurs mostly with posture, such as when holding an object away from the body and against gravity. This contrasts with hand tremor in Parkinson’s disease that occurs when the hands are at rest. Muscle rigidity, slowness of movement, change in posture and gait also occur with Parkinson’s disease but are uncommon with essential tremor. A lip or chin tremor may also be seen in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Cervical dystonia can be another cause of head tremor. Dystonia refers to a state of abnormal muscle tone leading to painful muscle spasms and abnormal posturing of a part of the body. When the muscle spasms and abnormal posture affect the neck it is referred to as cervical dystonia. Sustained abnormal posturing of the head is a hallmark of cervical dystonia. An enlargement of the neck muscles may be observed in cervical dystonia but is unusual in essential tremor.

Other features include an asymmetric elevation of the shoulders, excessive eye blinking or blepharospasm, and spasms of the facial muscles. Like ET, cervical dystonia can spread to one or the other arm, in long-standing cases. However, unlike essential tremor the head tremor from cervical dystonia may be associated with neck pain due to dystonic spasms.

Patients with cervical dystonia may employ sensory tricks to reduce the severity of the tremor. Touching the cheek or chin (a geste antagoniste) is a commonly employed sensory trick. Head tremor with cervical dystonia has a directional component and is usually worse when looking in one direction and reduced when looking in the opposite direction. It may be possible when examining the individual to find a head position where the tremor almost disappears. This position is referred to as a “null point”.

The diagnosis of tremor remains a clinical diagnosis. An MRI or CT scan of the brain is usually ordered to rule out structural lesions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis or a midbrain tumor. In patients where there is a question of whether the problem is essential tremor or parkinsonism, a DaTscan may be ordered. This scan is targeted towards the dopamine transporter (DaT) in the brain which is deficient in parkinsonism but normal in essential tremor. Blood tests to rule out hyperthyroidism and, in younger patients, screening tests for Wilson’s disease may also be considered.

The treatment of tremor is guided by the underlying cause. Propranolol and primidone are the mainstay of treatment for essential tremor. Other medication options that are helpful include gabapentin and topiramate. Cervical dystonia may respond to treatment with benzodiazepines. Clonazepam, which is a long-acting benzodiazepine, may be preferred in comparison to shorter acting drugs such as alprazolam or lorazepam. Baclofen can reduce dystonia by acting on GABAB receptors. Tizanidine is an alternative to baclofen. However, since tizanidine can cause liver damage (in rare cases), monitoring of liver enzymes for the first six months is recommended.

Botulinum toxins can play a role in the treatment of head tremor, particularly in dystonic head tremor. Botulinum toxins block the release of neurotransmitters. This results in decreased transmission of the signal from nerve ending to the muscle, thus reducing the tremor. Repeat injections are required every three to four months.

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery was approved by the FDA in 1997 for the treatment of tremor. However, the target in the brain varies based on the condition being treated. DBS surgery carries an approximately two percent risk of bleeding in the brain, hence it is only offered to patients with advanced tremor that is disabling and not controlled by medications. Head tremor can be more difficult to control than hand tremor and may require DBS surgery to be done on both sides of the brain.

Non-pharmacological methods to reduce head tremor rarely provide sustained benefit. Physical therapy is generally not useful, however, relaxation techniques can help reduce tremor as anxiety is often an exacerbating factor. There is no specific diet that is helpful but reducing caffeine intake can help reduce tremor.

Not every person with ET will be affected by head tremor. But if you are, it is important to talk to your physician so you understand what it is and what treatment options are best for you.

 

 

 

Having a Positive Impact on Those Who Struggle with Lifelong Conditions

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our fall 2018 scholarship recipients

 

By Deirdre Maciak,
Student Salem State University
Salem, MA

Essential tremor (ET) has affected me physically and emotionally, and has also played a role in my future career plans. I began noticing ET when I was in middle school, and was officially diagnosed as a sophomore in high school.

Photo of Deirdre Maciak, 2018 scholarship recipientPhysically it has affected me when I work out at the gym, play saxophone in my various school bands, and is worse when I’m tired or stressed out. I have tried a couple of medicines so far to treat it, and am working to determine what the right level of medicine is for me for now.

Emotionally it has affected my confidence level, especially when I realized how noticeable it had become. I sometimes hold off on activities I would like to do because of the ET, but am learning to manage the condition more proactively and look forward to being able to try new treatments in the future.

ET has also impacted my career choice to a degree as well. I am looking to pursue either nursing or biology in college, partly because I want to be able to have a positive impact on others who struggle with lifelong conditions. I also want to have the opportunity to either research new drugs or related treatments that would make the lives of those who deal with these types of conditions better.

I recently learned that a family friend, who is a research scientist, is actually working on a new drug for neurological disorders, which was very exciting. This type of work is intriguing to me.

I am very excited to start my college career this fall. While I know that ET will have some impact on me, I am becoming more confident that it’s a condition that I will be able to manage during these upcoming college years. I hope to both benefit from future ET treatments and, also have the chance to work on them as part of my future career path.

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Interested in supporting students with ET during their educational journey? Make a donation to the ET scholarship fund online.