Researchers prove resistance training benefits dexterity in ET patients

hand_weights_on_workout_matA recent IETF-funded study shows resistance training to be a possible therapy for individuals with ET. A team of researchers from Griffith University and Bond University in Australia identified that a generalized resistance training program for the upper limb is capable of improving manual dexterity in individuals with ET, and to a lesser degree, reduce abduction force tremor.

“Given that resistance training (RT) can reduce tremor amplitude and improve upper limb fine motor control in older adults, it is surprising that few studies have explored RT as a therapy for older adults with ET,” said Dr. Justin Keogh, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine of Bond University.

The lack of existing research inspired Keogh and his research team to compare healthy, older adults living with ET to those without ET through function tests. The function tests were used to assess activities common to everyday life. After a six-week resistance training program involving dumbbell bicep curls, wrist flexion and wrist extension exercises, functions test results significantly improved.

Results show that a simple dumbbell-based resistance training program had many significant benefits for older adults, with and without essential tremor. This indicated that both groups of older adults can significantly improve many real-world measures of manual dexterity. The greatest benefits following resistance training were gained for the limb most affected due to the disorder. This study is great news for individuals with ET to further explore the use resistance training as a viable therapy for improving upper
limb-function and ultimately, improving their quality of life.

To learn more about other IETF-funded research, please visit: http://essentialtremor.org/research/ietf-funded-research/.

The Power of Pets

pets

 

Because the symptoms of essential tremor worsen during times of stress/anxiety, it is important to find healthy methods of combating anxiety. One way to alleviate anxiety is to become a pet owner.

Studies have found:

-People with pets have lower blood pressure in stressful situations than those without pets.

-Playing with a pet can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.

-Pet owners over age 65 make 30% fewer visits to their doctors than those without pets.

Also, pets add structure and routine to your day. Regardless of how depressed or anxious you feel, your pet will require daily feedings, exercise and affection. Pets offer the opportunity to put your anxiety aside and focus on providing a loving, comfortable home for your four-legged friend.

Shelters throughout the country are always full of wonderful cats and dogs in need of a forever home. If a pet would fit into your lifestyle, do yourself and a lucky animal a favor-Adopt a pet!

Read stories of IETF members who are proud pet owners here.

Meet Me in St Louis!

Come spend some time with me and Dr. Pratap Chand Saturday morning, August 17, 2013 from 9:30 – 11:30 am at the St Louis Airport Marriott learning more about essential tremor. Go to www.essentialtremor.org/seminars to register. I look forward to meeting you and together learning about the medications, surgical options and research that is being done in ET.

Come and wear your button and take a picture with me so we can show people where our buttons have been and also to increase awareness around the St Louis area!

Milwaukee ET Event

We had a great time in Milwaukee with 80 people attending the extremely educational ET seminar. The presentations were very well done and provided a lot of information. Dr. Pahapill talked about his 20 year experience in the treatment of ET with deep brain stimulation and Dr. Blindauer reviewed the many medications that are often used and why some may not be successful in the treatment of ET.

For more information about the Froedtert and Medical College of Wisconsin Neurosciences Center go to: http://www.froedtert.com/SpecialtyAreas/ParkinsonsMovementDisorders/

 

 

 

 

Milwaukee Wisconsin here we come!

Hello Milwaukee and surrounding areas!

We will be facilitating another free ET education event/seminar on August 10 in Milwaukee. Come join us as we get together with the ET community to learn more about the diagnosis process and treatments available from Drs. Karen Blindauer and Peter Pahapill of the Medical College of Wisconsin. Follow this link www.essentialtremor.org/seminars  to register online or call toll-free at 888-387-3667. We look forward to seeing you there!

Where Has My Button Been?

Omaha 2 WHMBBHello Everyone!

We had so much fun at the Omaha Education Seminar and we all learned a lot from Drs. Torres-Russotto and Follett. We want to give both of them a huge thank you for sharing their time and expertise about ET. To learn more about the Movement Disorders Center at the University of Nebraska in Omaha go to http://www.unmc.edu/neurologicalsciences/movement_disorders.htm.Omaha Event WHMBB

Please join us in Irvine, CA for the upcoming event on Saturday, April 27. You can learn more at http://www.essentialtremor.org/Seminars. I would love to meet and share in the experience with you.

Mindfulness & ET

When medical or surgical therapy has not controlled all of the symptoms of essential tremor, some people have found that focused breathing and meditation are effective practices for calming the mind and body. In the cover story of our most recent Tremor Talk magazine, Dr. Monique Giroux writes that employing such mindfulness strategies can reduce the negative impact of stress and sharpen the mind’s potential for personal healing.

Dr. Giroux is co-founder of the Movement and Neuroperformance Center of Colorado in Englewood, Colo., and medical director of movement disorders for Swedish Medical Center.

“It is a way to stay in the present moment, engaging in life and living life as fully as you can,” she says. “Mindfulness can be a helpful tool to enhance the effect of medicine and surgery on tremor control. The next time your tremor feels ‘out of control,’ take a moment to reflect, and know that you have control in how you respond.”

Is mindfulness part of your regimen to regulate ET’s impact on your life? What has your personal experience been? Please share: inquiring minds want to know!

Coping with the challenges of ET can be difficult for children

Essential tremor affects people of all ages. For children, tweens, and teenagers, the challenges of living with ET can include difficulty performing school activities such as writing, typing, or drawing. Meal times at school may be stressful, and because they don’t understand ET, peers may make hurtful comments—intentionally or not.

If you are a young person, or the parent of a young person with ET, we’d love to hear from you here. Consider this a place to begin connecting with others like you. Ultimately, such connections should lead to greater understanding, a wider support network, and opportunities to share advice with other young people and their parents.

To get the ball rolling, we’ll share the insight of IETF Facebook page friend Kathryn Suzanne, who says her young child with ET has enjoyed using rock crayons because they’re easier to grip and control than traditional stick crayons.

 

Assistive device query spurs terrific IETF Facebook thread

The IETF’s Facebook friends are quite active and talkative. Recently, we posed the question “What assistive device have you found to be the most helpful when dealing with your essential tremor?” In just a few hours, the post had accumulated more than 70 replies.

Responses went beyond what we might consider “assistive devices” in the tangible sense, mentioning medications, alternative medicine, diet, and other areas of interest for the ET community. Many of the postings underscore or expand on ideas presented in the coping tips section of the IETF website.

We’re just delighted to see so much dialogue in the ET community, with so many positive thoughts shared. So what insights and additions might you contribute to this conversation?