The Determination to Keep Fighting the Challenges of ET

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our spring 2018 scholarship recipients.

By Brogan Speraw,
Freshman at Ohio University,
Athens, OH

As I enter my freshman year of college, I’m anxious for the trails ahead. What classes to take, what will finals be like, how different will the classroom setting be from the one I’ve grown accustomed to. But one tends to worry me more than the others: how will my tremors affect my college life?

My tremors make my penmanship very poor, and my fine motor skills suffer as well. This has caused many challenges in my life, including struggling in art classes due to my inability to draw effectively. In the past, my classmates would ridicule me for my shaking hands by making comments about how I shake or how I must be nervous, or how I could be used as a seismometer (an earthquake detector). But, being the person I am, I have learned to take the ridicule and laugh with them as well, often times joining in and having a better time because of it. I have had to learn how to explain the shaking of my hands. With age, I have also learned not to be embarrassed, but proud of the strong person I have become because of my condition.

Normal everyday tasks for most tend to be a challenge for me, one of them being eating in public. I tend to choose what I eat in public very carefully. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve also learned how to live with eating and tremors significantly better, more often than not, ordering foods that I know will challenge me simply for the challenge itself.

I have a 504 plan that will follow me throughout college and the workforce. My disability will never go away, but I haven’t allowed this disability to hold me back. My neurologist predicted that I wouldn’t be able to write by my freshman year of high school, but I continued to write daily up until my junior year. It was during my junior year that I had to start doing a majority of my work by typing on a laptop. For my tests with answer choices that need bubbled-in, the school provides me with a scribe. Although this disability is a daily struggle, I have maintained a GPA of 3.967.

During college, I will continue to refuse to allow my disability to hold me back. It may be a challenge, but it is a challenge I intend to take on wholeheartedly, doing my best to make sure I succeed in all my academic endeavors.

I have been blessed with the determination to keep fighting the challenges that have been put in front of me, therefore being able to complete whatever I put my mind to.

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Interested in supporting students with ET during their educational journey? Make a donation to the ET scholarship fund online.

 

 

Being a Child with ET is Like Being a Tiny Sapling in a Windstorm

By Allison Dyke,
Student at Kuyper College

Allison Dyke

Having essential tremor is like being a tree with leaves shaking uncontrollably in the wind. Even though your roots are strong, you are unable to control the movement of your branches.
However, being a child with essential tremor is like being a tiny sapling stuck in a powerful windstorm. You are not fully developed and your roots have not been completely planted.

ET Diagnosis
Since the age of four, I have battled with essential tremor. My shaky hands and legs made tasks such as eating, tying shoes, and riding bikes difficult to complete. I was just learning how to do these activities, which can be challenging without having a movement disorder. While these tasks were strenuous, the hardest part about being a child with essential tremor was other children and adults jumped to conclusions without understanding what essential tremor is.

“She’s just stubborn,” was often coldly stated to my parents as an explanation of why I was failing at making a perfect bow with my shoelaces. If I wasn’t being “stubborn” I must be either nervous or cold. Fine motor skills were frustrating to master and I became withdrawn from participating in physical activities. It was hard to understand why I couldn’t do what other children my age could do. With supportive parents, I was encouraged to never give up. The saying at my house is, “Where there is a will, there is a way.”

Soon I found an activity where shaking didn’t matter, swimming. It helped rebuild the confidence that this disorder had taken away. I found ways around difficult tasks, such as using assistive devices to improve my penmanship or supporting my elbow when applying makeup. It was clear that the physical and emotional effects of essential tremor were not going to dictate my future.

Connecting with the IETF
Then at sixteen, I discovered the International Essential Tremor Foundation, and wish I would have found them sooner. Their website provided informational downloads that I gave to my teachers and school administrators, so they could better understand this disorder. I connected with other kids my age who were going through the same experiences. IETF encouraged me to reach out to my community by organizing awareness walks and starting a support group. And they provided me with a college scholarship. With their support, I have met wonderful people who understand what having tremors is all about and I know I am not alone.

Now I’m nineteen and people still ask if I’m cold or nervous. But, I’ve learned that sharing my experience and educating others about essential tremor gives me an opportunity to explain that this condition is not just for older adults, but impacts young people as well. An estimated 10 million people in the United States are affected by this condition, yet very few have heard of it or understand it’s impact. Through awareness, I’m no longer a tiny sapling; I am strong oak supported by a dense forest away from the wind.

Editor’s Note
Allison is one of thousands of children and young adults around the world who struggle to live normal lives with essential tremor. She is a former IETF Scholarship Recipient. The scholarship program is one of many support programs conducted by the IETF. Your donations help support these programs and people with essential tremor. Donate today. 

Joy Schaaf in the News!

Recently we got this great news from one of our most supportive voices and ardent supporter – Joy Schaaf. We congratulate Joy on her great video and all the support she has provided in the last two years. For more about Joy visit, http://www.essentialtremor.org/read.asp?docid=907 and her story appears 3/4 the way down the page.

Dear IETF and Friends,
Joy Schaaf is at it again. Spreading awareness through a skit. Ohio has a 4-H Health and Safety Skit Competition. Joy and her sister Hope wrote a skit about her essential tremors. They won at county level and then again at regional level. Tomorrow they will be attending the Ohio State Fair for the final round in the competition. Last year it was taped and put on the internet. We are hoping it will be taped again. If she wins and if it is taped, we will let you know where you can watch it. Information from your website was very helpful in the writing of this skit and all information obtained was sited correctly.
Sincerely,
Teresa Schaaf

They didn’t win, but they did an excellent job! You can watch the video online at the following link: http://www.ohiochannel.org/medialibrary/Media.aspx?fileId=139803. The skit “Essential Tremors” is halfway through all the videos at 47:45 min. Check it out!
Teresa

Coping with the challenges of ET can be difficult for children

Essential tremor affects people of all ages. For children, tweens, and teenagers, the challenges of living with ET can include difficulty performing school activities such as writing, typing, or drawing. Meal times at school may be stressful, and because they don’t understand ET, peers may make hurtful comments—intentionally or not.

If you are a young person, or the parent of a young person with ET, we’d love to hear from you here. Consider this a place to begin connecting with others like you. Ultimately, such connections should lead to greater understanding, a wider support network, and opportunities to share advice with other young people and their parents.

To get the ball rolling, we’ll share the insight of IETF Facebook page friend Kathryn Suzanne, who says her young child with ET has enjoyed using rock crayons because they’re easier to grip and control than traditional stick crayons.