Educating Others About Invisible Disabilities, Including Essential Tremor

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our fall 2018 scholarship recipients

 

By Megan Hartley,
Student at Florida Southern College

When I was 15, I was diagnosed with essential tremor. In March 2018, my 15-year-old sister was diagnosed with essential tremor. This letter is for her.

You have heard all the negative experiences that have been a part of my diagnosis: the accusations that I stole my grandmother’s handicap because I couldn’t possibly have one of my own; being bullied because I got extra time on exams that I “didn’t need;” and not being able to walk after a long day. People will be cruel because they do not understand.

What I want you to know is that it isn’t something that has to define you or be completely negative; so many positives have come out of it for me. It has allowed me to better understand what it is truly like to have a diversity that no one understands. It has pushed me to try to educate those who do not understand invisible disabilities in a positive way.

In the spring of 2016, I was allowed the opportunity to be on the cover and to speak out about what it is like to have anxiety and essential tremor for the International Essential Tremor Foundation’s magazine, Tremor Talk.

At Florida Southern alone, in my role as a resident advisor, I have been able to design community-wide programs that encourage students to ask questions and to get knowledge about those diversities they do not understand. The series that went on to win community program of the year included invisible disabilities, culture and identity. I have had the opportunity to present at the Florida Resident Advisor Conference and took home an award for my presentation about invisible disabilities inclusion in the residence halls.

Quote about invisible disabilitiesThis semester, I am partnering with other campus organizations to promote invisible disabilities week on campus in October. I have had the opportunity to do multiple projects and papers about disabilities and their relationship to the world around us. You are able to combat the negativity by allowing it to be an education opportunity for those around you.

Overall, what I want you to understand, is that, for me, the positives outweigh the negatives. I believe that essential tremor has allowed me to be a more compassionate person. Though I cannot speak to every diversity, I feel as though I can understand what it is like to have your identity questioned simply because it is not seen from the outside.

Though some days the tremors make it difficult to stand, I will always stand up for those who need it.

*********

Interested in supporting students with ET during their educational journey? Make a donation to the ET scholarship fund online.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.