No Boundaries, No Favorites. Essential Tremor Has No Familiar Face.

By Tammy Dodderidge, IETF Marketing and Communications Manager

Who do you picture in your mind when you think about someone who has essential tremor? Chances are, it’s a senior adult or a grandparent. The reality is essential tremor has no familiar face. It afflicts people all ages and races. While senior adults struggle with it, so do middle-aged adults, teens and even toddlers. It doesn’t discriminate based on the color of your hair, or eyes or skin.

This is our message during National Essential Tremor Awareness (NETA) Month in March. We want people to understand that ET has no boundaries. It doesn’t play favorites. It is a serious, debilitating condition for more than 10 million people around the world.

Background on NETA Month
Thanks to a three-year effort by the International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF), in 2010 Congress passed a House resolution that officially designates March as National Essential Tremor Awareness Month. This month gives ET a platform. Most people have heard of Parkinson’s disease and the physical tremors associated with it, but not many have heard of essential tremor. We need to let them know it exists and then educate them about the needs of people with ET.

The next time you are in a crowd, look around and chances are, someone there has ET. You won’t know it because it’s something that people work hard to hide. You won’t know it because people are embarrassed by it. You won’t know it because people fight it and deny it. You won’t know it because many people who have ET suffer depression and isolate themselves so they don’t even leave their houses.

Take Action
What can you do to take part in NETA Month? Many, many things!

  • The IETF has created some special NETA Month social media banners specifically for Facebook and Twitter. Download them from our website and use them on your social media sites during the month of March (as the cover art or just share them with your friends and followers).
  • Order one of our NETA Month posters and hang it in a prominent area where people will notice it: your church, the grocery store, the library, your office. When someone asks, “What’s this poster? What is essential tremor?” you will have done your job in raising awareness!
  • Watch this Tremor Talk blog site during March. We will be featuring some guest writers who have ET, work in the ET community and advocate for people with ET. Their first-hand stories promise to be insightful and educational – and heartfelt. Share these blogs on your social media sites, or send the links to your friends by email. RAISE AWARENESS!
  • Hold a Do It Yourself (DIY) Fundraiser to support the work the IETF does toward education, research and advocacy. We have a list of DIY fund raising ideas on our website, and we also have special DIY  fund raising posters you can order from us for free to advertise your events.
  • Watch your mail for a letter from the IETF and make a donation to receive an NETA Month t-shirt and/or tote bag. These items are one more way to get ET in the public eye. Wear your shirt proudly and use your tote when shopping, or for carrying items to and from work. If you are not on our mailing list, you can join our mailing list online.

Once we all begin to see ET as a condition that impacts millions of people all over the world, we will begin to realize the need for more research that will lead to new treatments, and hopefully someday, a way to prevent or cure it for everyone.

Speak up, speak out and let’s rock this year’s NETA Month!

 

Share Your ET Stories with Me

Hello to everyone in the essential tremor community!

I am new to the International Essential Tremor Foundation and wanted to introduce myself. I am the new marketing and communications manager. My role involves development of messages and stories to educate the public about essential tremor and the impact it has on more than 10 million people nationwide. I serve as editor of our magazine, Tremor Talk, and our Tremor Gram enewsletter. I oversee our social media sites, Facebook and Twitter, and manage our website, among other responsibilities.

I must confess I had never heard of ET before I applied for this position. How could that be? It impacts so many people and yet I was not aware. But I am catching up. Each day I read and hear stories from people of all ages who are living with ET. Just this week I was reviewing the applications from our scholarship recipients and was in awe of their positive outlooks, and also saddened by what they have had to endure. One student was diagnosed at age six, so he has had little experience of NOT having ET. One is a mother of three who said her biggest challenge has been answering her children when they ask, “Will I shake like that when I grow up?”

I am proud to work for an organization that is serving the ET community with awareness and education initiatives, and support, like scholarships. And last year we donated $75,000 toward research initiatives to further better treatment options for ET.

The learning will continue for me, and I am asking all of you for your support in this area. I would not be able to do my work without the ET community at large who share their stories of hope, frustration and, sometimes despair. No, some stories are not happy ones, but these are the ones that may resonate with others who are battling each day. I will do my best to share these stories and keep the lines of communication open. And, I look forward to the day when I can write that story about the breakthrough in research that will help everyone. I know it’s coming . . . keep the faith. . . and keep in touch with me.

I look forward to hearing from all of you out there. Write to me at tammy@essentialtremor.org.

 

 

Joy Schaaf in the News!

Recently we got this great news from one of our most supportive voices and ardent supporter – Joy Schaaf. We congratulate Joy on her great video and all the support she has provided in the last two years. For more about Joy visit, http://www.essentialtremor.org/read.asp?docid=907 and her story appears 3/4 the way down the page.

Dear IETF and Friends,
Joy Schaaf is at it again. Spreading awareness through a skit. Ohio has a 4-H Health and Safety Skit Competition. Joy and her sister Hope wrote a skit about her essential tremors. They won at county level and then again at regional level. Tomorrow they will be attending the Ohio State Fair for the final round in the competition. Last year it was taped and put on the internet. We are hoping it will be taped again. If she wins and if it is taped, we will let you know where you can watch it. Information from your website was very helpful in the writing of this skit and all information obtained was sited correctly.
Sincerely,
Teresa Schaaf

They didn’t win, but they did an excellent job! You can watch the video online at the following link: http://www.ohiochannel.org/medialibrary/Media.aspx?fileId=139803. The skit “Essential Tremors” is halfway through all the videos at 47:45 min. Check it out!
Teresa

Meet Me in St Louis!

Come spend some time with me and Dr. Pratap Chand Saturday morning, August 17, 2013 from 9:30 – 11:30 am at the St Louis Airport Marriott learning more about essential tremor. Go to www.essentialtremor.org/seminars to register. I look forward to meeting you and together learning about the medications, surgical options and research that is being done in ET.

Come and wear your button and take a picture with me so we can show people where our buttons have been and also to increase awareness around the St Louis area!

Milwaukee ET Event

We had a great time in Milwaukee with 80 people attending the extremely educational ET seminar. The presentations were very well done and provided a lot of information. Dr. Pahapill talked about his 20 year experience in the treatment of ET with deep brain stimulation and Dr. Blindauer reviewed the many medications that are often used and why some may not be successful in the treatment of ET.

For more information about the Froedtert and Medical College of Wisconsin Neurosciences Center go to: http://www.froedtert.com/SpecialtyAreas/ParkinsonsMovementDisorders/

 

 

 

 

July DC Report

In July, Tom Bruderle, IETF Legislative Liaison, and Catherine Rice, IETF Executive Director participated in the July 22 NIH BRAIN Initiative Webinar designed to engage the patient advocacy community in the research pursuant to President Obama’s commitment earlier this year. There were about 100 people on the call with a second event anticipated sometime in the fall. Currently, NIH is developing specific scientific goals for the Initiative and has a website up and running at http://www.nih.gov/science/brain/index.htm where you can follow the progress.

Not much has occurred this month in the House and Senate. Tom continues to increase awareness and educate our congressional representatives about essential tremor. If you have a congressional representative or senator in DC that you would like for Tom to visit, please send us an email at info@essentialtremor.org.

 

Milwaukee Wisconsin here we come!

Hello Milwaukee and surrounding areas!

We will be facilitating another free ET education event/seminar on August 10 in Milwaukee. Come join us as we get together with the ET community to learn more about the diagnosis process and treatments available from Drs. Karen Blindauer and Peter Pahapill of the Medical College of Wisconsin. Follow this link www.essentialtremor.org/seminars  to register online or call toll-free at 888-387-3667. We look forward to seeing you there!

Mindfulness & ET

When medical or surgical therapy has not controlled all of the symptoms of essential tremor, some people have found that focused breathing and meditation are effective practices for calming the mind and body. In the cover story of our most recent Tremor Talk magazine, Dr. Monique Giroux writes that employing such mindfulness strategies can reduce the negative impact of stress and sharpen the mind’s potential for personal healing.

Dr. Giroux is co-founder of the Movement and Neuroperformance Center of Colorado in Englewood, Colo., and medical director of movement disorders for Swedish Medical Center.

“It is a way to stay in the present moment, engaging in life and living life as fully as you can,” she says. “Mindfulness can be a helpful tool to enhance the effect of medicine and surgery on tremor control. The next time your tremor feels ‘out of control,’ take a moment to reflect, and know that you have control in how you respond.”

Is mindfulness part of your regimen to regulate ET’s impact on your life? What has your personal experience been? Please share: inquiring minds want to know!

Coping with the challenges of ET can be difficult for children

Essential tremor affects people of all ages. For children, tweens, and teenagers, the challenges of living with ET can include difficulty performing school activities such as writing, typing, or drawing. Meal times at school may be stressful, and because they don’t understand ET, peers may make hurtful comments—intentionally or not.

If you are a young person, or the parent of a young person with ET, we’d love to hear from you here. Consider this a place to begin connecting with others like you. Ultimately, such connections should lead to greater understanding, a wider support network, and opportunities to share advice with other young people and their parents.

To get the ball rolling, we’ll share the insight of IETF Facebook page friend Kathryn Suzanne, who says her young child with ET has enjoyed using rock crayons because they’re easier to grip and control than traditional stick crayons.

 

Assistive device query spurs terrific IETF Facebook thread

The IETF’s Facebook friends are quite active and talkative. Recently, we posed the question “What assistive device have you found to be the most helpful when dealing with your essential tremor?” In just a few hours, the post had accumulated more than 70 replies.

Responses went beyond what we might consider “assistive devices” in the tangible sense, mentioning medications, alternative medicine, diet, and other areas of interest for the ET community. Many of the postings underscore or expand on ideas presented in the coping tips section of the IETF website.

We’re just delighted to see so much dialogue in the ET community, with so many positive thoughts shared. So what insights and additions might you contribute to this conversation?