New Year, New Opportunities

Patrick McCartney
Executive Director

As we kick off 2018, we are excited about the New Year and the opportunities to promote our mission to provide hope to the essential tremor (ET) community worldwide through awareness, education, support, and research.

The IETF is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2018. We will kick off the celebration in March, which also happens to be National Essential Tremor Awareness month. There are a variety of ways for you to advocate for more ET awareness and education in your community. To learn more about how you can get involved here.

When we ask ET patients what they would like to see the IETF focus its efforts on, one subject comes up consistently: research to help find a dedicated treatment(s) for ET and, hopefully, someday a cure.

With the generous support of our donors,
we have been able to fund more than
$750,000 in ET research.

 

If you would like to learn more about the studies your donations have funded and the results they have achieved, you can find more information here.

Also, there are several clinical trials currently taking place that focus on ET-specific medications and wearable devices. If you are interested in participating in one of these trials check out the list of programs on the IETF website. You can also visit www.clinicaltrials.gov for easy access to free information on clinical studies for a wide range of conditions including ET.

Another great way to get involved is through a local support group. The IETF currently has more than 60 support groups around the world. We have a listing of all the supports groups on our website here. Or take part in our online support group through Facebook.

If you can’t find a support group in your area and Facebook isn’t your thing, we encourage you to consider starting a support group. We have all the tools to get you started and help you promote the meetings.

As always, we thank you for your support of the IETF and the ET community. The IETF has so many resources to share with patients, doctors, family members, and caregivers. We hope you will spread the word and help us continue to educate people on the most common movement disorder in the world.

 

 

Share Your ET Stories with Me

Hello to everyone in the essential tremor community!

I am new to the International Essential Tremor Foundation and wanted to introduce myself. I am the new marketing and communications manager. My role involves development of messages and stories to educate the public about essential tremor and the impact it has on more than 10 million people nationwide. I serve as editor of our magazine, Tremor Talk, and our Tremor Gram enewsletter. I oversee our social media sites, Facebook and Twitter, and manage our website, among other responsibilities.

I must confess I had never heard of ET before I applied for this position. How could that be? It impacts so many people and yet I was not aware. But I am catching up. Each day I read and hear stories from people of all ages who are living with ET. Just this week I was reviewing the applications from our scholarship recipients and was in awe of their positive outlooks, and also saddened by what they have had to endure. One student was diagnosed at age six, so he has had little experience of NOT having ET. One is a mother of three who said her biggest challenge has been answering her children when they ask, “Will I shake like that when I grow up?”

I am proud to work for an organization that is serving the ET community with awareness and education initiatives, and support, like scholarships. And last year we donated $75,000 toward research initiatives to further better treatment options for ET.

The learning will continue for me, and I am asking all of you for your support in this area. I would not be able to do my work without the ET community at large who share their stories of hope, frustration and, sometimes despair. No, some stories are not happy ones, but these are the ones that may resonate with others who are battling each day. I will do my best to share these stories and keep the lines of communication open. And, I look forward to the day when I can write that story about the breakthrough in research that will help everyone. I know it’s coming . . . keep the faith. . . and keep in touch with me.

I look forward to hearing from all of you out there. Write to me at tammy@essentialtremor.org.

 

 

IETF Welcomes New Executive Director

Catherine Rice webThe IETF Board of Directors announces that after 18 years of leadership, Catherine S. Rice is retiring as Executive Director of the organization.  Throughout her tenure, Cathy has increased the IETF’s reach to over 100,000 people around the world.  Cathy, along with now retired Kansas House Representative Dennis Moore, in 2010 achieved formal designation for the month of March as National Essential Tremor Awareness Month.  In the last 10 years, she has facilitated 380 free ET patient education events in cities across the U.S., educating over 35,000 people.  Cathy also established a college scholarship program for students having a diagnosis of ET, as well as an ET research grant program that has awarded $1 million, thus far, for promising ET studies conducted by medical investigators.  We cannot thank her enough for her vision, dedication, and commitment to the IETF.

Patrick photoTo continue our desire to further our mission, the Board is pleased to announce Patrick McCartney as the new IETF Executive Director, effective Aug. 17, 2015.  Patrick brings over 20 years of experience with non-profit organizations.  He most recently served as the Executive Director of the Kansas City Kansas Community College Endowment Association.  Previously, Patrick was Vice President of Marketing at the Kansas City Kansas Chamber of Commerce.  His work experience focused on board relations, fiscal management, marketing and communications, and fundraising.  Please join us in welcoming Patrick to the IETF.  With your support, we are confident that he will continue the excellence of the IETF.

One of Cathy’s passions at the IETF was to recognize the achievements of students dealing with ET.  To honor and help continue Cathy’s work with college students, the Board is pleased to announce the establishment of the Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund.  This fund will be used to award four scholarships to deserving students both in the fall and winter semesters.  For anyone wishing to recognize the dedication of Cathy, the Board encourages donations to this fund, in her honor.  Information about the fund is available at www.essentialtremor.org/scholarships or 1-888-387-3667. Donations and/or notes to Cathy can also be mailed to IETF, C/O Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund, PO Box 14005, Lenexa, KS  66285-4005.

The IETF awards four scholarships to exceptional students with ET

IETF Scholarship Recipient Karissa Hartzell

The International Essential Tremor Foundation is pleased to award four students who are affected by essential tremor with $500 scholarships for the 2015-2016 academic year:  Tyler Criswell from Altoona, Ala.; Karissa Hartzell from Andover, Ohio (pictured left); Katie Merrill from Arvada, Colo.; and Hannah Spence from Colchester, Vt.

“These four students exhibit impressive qualifications based on academic and extracurricular activities in their communities and will become outstanding, future leaders in helping create more awareness about essential tremor,” said Catherine Rice, Executive Director of the IETF.

People with essential tremor have to be adaptable. Daily activities are often difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish without some type of assistance. It takes a special type of person to look obstacles in the eye and continue to push forward, regardless of the amount of time or effort it takes. It takes drive, passion, and a strong sense of self, and these four scholarship recipients truly display what it takes to be successful in their college careers while coping with ET. Read more about their stories here.

IETF scholarships are awarded to qualified students of all ages who have been diagnosed with ET, to lessen the burden of higher education. The scholarship can be used for supplies, books or tuition at licensed, accredited institutions of higher education (including trade schools) and are paid directly to the educational institution. For more information about the IETF scholarship program, please visit www.essentialtremor.org/about-the-ietf/scholarships.

 

Where Has My Button Been?

Omaha 2 WHMBBHello Everyone!

We had so much fun at the Omaha Education Seminar and we all learned a lot from Drs. Torres-Russotto and Follett. We want to give both of them a huge thank you for sharing their time and expertise about ET. To learn more about the Movement Disorders Center at the University of Nebraska in Omaha go to http://www.unmc.edu/neurologicalsciences/movement_disorders.htm.Omaha Event WHMBB

Please join us in Irvine, CA for the upcoming event on Saturday, April 27. You can learn more at http://www.essentialtremor.org/Seminars. I would love to meet and share in the experience with you.

Coping with the challenges of ET can be difficult for children

Essential tremor affects people of all ages. For children, tweens, and teenagers, the challenges of living with ET can include difficulty performing school activities such as writing, typing, or drawing. Meal times at school may be stressful, and because they don’t understand ET, peers may make hurtful comments—intentionally or not.

If you are a young person, or the parent of a young person with ET, we’d love to hear from you here. Consider this a place to begin connecting with others like you. Ultimately, such connections should lead to greater understanding, a wider support network, and opportunities to share advice with other young people and their parents.

To get the ball rolling, we’ll share the insight of IETF Facebook page friend Kathryn Suzanne, who says her young child with ET has enjoyed using rock crayons because they’re easier to grip and control than traditional stick crayons.

 

Assistive device query spurs terrific IETF Facebook thread

The IETF’s Facebook friends are quite active and talkative. Recently, we posed the question “What assistive device have you found to be the most helpful when dealing with your essential tremor?” In just a few hours, the post had accumulated more than 70 replies.

Responses went beyond what we might consider “assistive devices” in the tangible sense, mentioning medications, alternative medicine, diet, and other areas of interest for the ET community. Many of the postings underscore or expand on ideas presented in the coping tips section of the IETF website.

We’re just delighted to see so much dialogue in the ET community, with so many positive thoughts shared. So what insights and additions might you contribute to this conversation?