Essential Tremor Has Made Me Adaptable and Determined

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) awards four $1,000 college scholarships to students who have essential tremor through its Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund. As part of the application process, students are asked to write an essay on the topic, “how essential tremor has affected my life.” The following essay is from one of our spring 2019 scholarship recipients.

By Brogan Speraw,
Ohio University

Essential tremor has affected me in multiple ways. The first and most significant of these is that it provided me with the determination I have today. My tremors have been a constant struggle in my life. The simple tasks of filling in the bubbles of a test, feeding myself a bowl of soup, and tying my shoes were always a challenge. When I was younger, I was persistently frustrated by my condition until one day my brother told me to approach it like a game. Being the child I was, I refused to lose any game and aspired to find a solution to every conflict thrown in my path. It gave me a new outlook and an inner need to beat my tremor any way I could. Eventually, this “game” became routine, and I began applying it to other facets of my life such as academics, sports and my other extracurricular activities. This strategy evolved into a way of life, fueling me with the motivation to accomplish everything I did, or at the very least, put my best efforts into it.

spring 2019 scholarship winner brogan speraw

Furthermore, my tremors have also given me the skills of adaptability, a strength that has impressed my professors and colleagues alike. When hit with adversity, I find a way to succeed. I attribute that entirely to my tremors and the support of my family. For example, in 2017, my group in the introduction to engineering class was confronted by a sudden problem. Our assignment: an elevator of our own design, built by myself and my team. This was not only our final, but also a competition among teams to see who could lift the most weight up one meter in the shortest amount of time. On the final test day, our elevator was doing wonderfully until the time came for the judging. Our elevator failed twice and we were allotted two additional attempts to both fix our elevator and pass the assignment. On our third attempt, it almost failed again due to a soldering malfunction. To resolve the issue, I simply forced the wires into their proper position. The payload fell for an instant before quickly rising again, resulting in finishing third place for my team and I. This was a prime situation to present my adaptability.

Finally, my tremors have given me an invaluable asset in life: thick skin. This is an important skill for anyone to have, but for someone with any sort of disability in public school systems, this is necessary. The ability to take comments about you and just let them go is vital in my experience. Honestly, it was difficult at times, but I learned that it was easier than attempting to pursue any aggressive retaliation. This skill was mastered through trial and error. By learning to let hurtful people and situations go, I’m glad to state that it has aided me immensely with making and maintaining valuable, honest friendships and relationships.

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Applications are being accepted for fall 2019 scholarships from the IETF.  If you are a current or incoming college student with essential tremor, complete the application on the IETF website. The application deadline is May 1, 2019.

The Determination to Keep Fighting the Challenges of ET

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our spring 2018 scholarship recipients.

By Brogan Speraw,
Freshman at Ohio University,
Athens, OH

As I enter my freshman year of college, I’m anxious for the trails ahead. What classes to take, what will finals be like, how different will the classroom setting be from the one I’ve grown accustomed to. But one tends to worry me more than the others: how will my tremors affect my college life?

My tremors make my penmanship very poor, and my fine motor skills suffer as well. This has caused many challenges in my life, including struggling in art classes due to my inability to draw effectively. In the past, my classmates would ridicule me for my shaking hands by making comments about how I shake or how I must be nervous, or how I could be used as a seismometer (an earthquake detector). But, being the person I am, I have learned to take the ridicule and laugh with them as well, often times joining in and having a better time because of it. I have had to learn how to explain the shaking of my hands. With age, I have also learned not to be embarrassed, but proud of the strong person I have become because of my condition.

Normal everyday tasks for most tend to be a challenge for me, one of them being eating in public. I tend to choose what I eat in public very carefully. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve also learned how to live with eating and tremors significantly better, more often than not, ordering foods that I know will challenge me simply for the challenge itself.

I have a 504 plan that will follow me throughout college and the workforce. My disability will never go away, but I haven’t allowed this disability to hold me back. My neurologist predicted that I wouldn’t be able to write by my freshman year of high school, but I continued to write daily up until my junior year. It was during my junior year that I had to start doing a majority of my work by typing on a laptop. For my tests with answer choices that need bubbled-in, the school provides me with a scribe. Although this disability is a daily struggle, I have maintained a GPA of 3.967.

During college, I will continue to refuse to allow my disability to hold me back. It may be a challenge, but it is a challenge I intend to take on wholeheartedly, doing my best to make sure I succeed in all my academic endeavors.

I have been blessed with the determination to keep fighting the challenges that have been put in front of me, therefore being able to complete whatever I put my mind to.

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Interested in supporting students with ET during their educational journey? Make a donation to the ET scholarship fund online.