Study seeks DBS advancement

DBSDeep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been around for many years and is one of the most common surgical options for the treatment of essential tremor.  Recently, a new system has been developed that takes DBS to the next level. The new device actually senses and records the brain signals that cause the symptoms of essential tremor and other movement disorders, allowing researchers the opportunity to see exactly what signals are related to abnormal movements.

Although approved for use in the European Union in January, Medtronic’s Activa PC+S system has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States. However, the new device is currently cleared for study in the U.S. and two patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease have already undergone the surgical implantation of the new device.

The hope is that in the near future, this technology will develop to a level where the device itself will monitor the patient’s brain activity and automatically adjust therapy based on the individual’s needs– just as a pacemaker does for heart patients today. This would be a big advancement in DBS if this technology can be developed. Instead of DBS sending a constant, unchanging signal to cancel out tremor symptoms, the device itself would automatically make adjustments and changes to offer patients optimum benefit.

Read more about this study here or learn more about surgical options for essential tremor in this webinar.

IETF Medical Advisory Board Member on TED

Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias photo

Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias

TED, a nonprofit devoted to “Ideas Worth Spreading”, brings the world’s most captivating speakers to the masses through short, prepared talks covering today’s cutting edge technology, entertainment, and design topics. The TED conference recently visited Charlottesville, VA, where IETF Medical Advisory Board member, Dr. W. Jeffrey Elias, discussed his work on the Focused Ultrasound research study for essential tremor.

As Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia,Dr. Elias has led a number of research investigations. In 2011, his team became the first in the world to successfully treat a person with disabling [essential] tremor using focused ultrasound that was guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This procedure and subsequent clinical trials have resulted in an outpouring around the globe of investigations using ultrasound interventions to treat disorders of the brain. ¹

In his presentation, Dr. Elias shared his study results along with a message of the importance of research to further scientific advances.

Watch the taped presentation. Dr. Elias is the second to the last speaker (click on the timeline at approximately 08:30.00 to get right to his section).

¹[Unattributed] TEDx, http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/8358. Nov.15, 2013.

New study searches for more precise diagnostic tool

Brain ChangesIt is sometimes difficult, even for a trained neurologist, to tell the difference between Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor when it is in the early stages, as they can share similar symptoms (such as resting tremor). A new Taiwan-based study investigated changes in brain volume in people with essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease, searching for a pattern that might help differentiate between to the two conditions more easily.

The study found that although both ET and PD patients showed a decrease in brain volume in areas involved with movement and muscle control, it also showed increases in other distinct areas. Researchers speculate that this is due to the ability of the brain to compensate for damaged areas by developing and strengthening new pathways, thus increasing the size of those areas.

Although further study is needed, it appears that looking specifically at the areas of the brain that increase in volume, along with other diagnostic and assessment tools, may allow physicians to more accurately differentiate between ET and PD.

Read the abstract.