GivingTuesday Donations Support Students with ET

By Tammy Dodderidge
IETF Marketing and Communications Manager

The determination and bravery of people with essential tremor is inspirational. It’s particularly touching when it comes from young people.

It’s truly the honor of the International Essential Tremor Foundation to support students with essential tremor as they journey toward adulthood and pursue their higher education. Each semester we award four college scholarships as part of our Catherine Rice Scholarship Program (named in honor of former IETF executive director who had a particular passion for these young people). This year, 100% of GivingTuesday donations made will go to the scholarship fund. GivingTuesday is an international day of charitable giving. This year it takes place on December 3.

Here’s a little bit about some our past student scholars. . . . .

Anna
2019 scholarship recipient, Anna Grace Easley, shared with us her story of becoming more frustrated every time she visited the doctor. The realization that her essential tremor would always be a part of her was overwhelming. The “aha” moment came when her doctor asked, “If you could trade your ET for any other disorder, would you?” It gave her a different perspective. She said, “I would not trade it for blindness, deafness, paralysis, amputation or any other physical disability. It was at this moment that I realized how truly blessed I am.”

Graham
2018 scholarship recipient Graham Gaddis said having ET has not been easy, but it has made him stronger and given him compassion for others.

“In the shadows and in the quiet, I have found an identity, and much of this identity has developed from facing head-on the difficulties of living with essential tremor (ET). I realize that having ET has actually strengthened my resolve to tackle life’s challenges and achieve my personal goals,” he said.

Madison
Four-time scholarship recipient Madison Young is majoring in rehabilitation science in college with plans to become a physical therapist. Because of her ET disability, she feels she will have a better understanding of others who have physical obstacles to overcome.

“It is an empowering feeling to be able to help someone,” she said. “And when you are helping someone and they connect with you because you aren’t perfect either, it makes it all worth it.”

Deirdre
2018 scholarship recipient Deirdre Maciak is looking at a career in nursing or biology because she wants to be able to have a positive impact on others who are struggling with lifelong conditions, like ET. And she’s optimistic about the future.

“I’m not the first or last teenager out there whose plans have been derailed in some capacity due to essential tremor. But, I am part of a generation of people with the condition who have better access to experimental treatments due to research and new discoveries.”

Your Donation Provides Support
Help the IETF continue to provide support for college students with essential tremor by making a donation on GivingTuesday. It makes such a huge impact. Here’s the impact it had on Elizabeth Carroll.

“Your generosity brings me one step closer toward my dream of attending law school in order to become an advocate for students with disabilities,” she said.

Donate through the IETF website or call (toll free) 888-387-3667 to make a donation over the phone.

If You Could Trade Your ET for Any Other Disorder, Would You?

Each semester, the International Essential Tremor Foundation presents four scholarships to students with essential tremor. The scholarships represent hope for the future, and provide support to these students during a pivotal time in their lives. As part of the scholarship application process, each applicant is asked to write an essay that answers the question, “How has essential tremor affected my life?” The following essay is from one of our fall 2019 scholarship recipients.

By Anna Grace Easley
2019 IETF Scholarship Recipient,
Student at William Carey University, Hattiesburg, MS

Anna Easley, 2019 IETF Scholarship Recipient

Like millions of others in the United States, I suffer from essential tremor or ET. At the age of two years old, my mom started to notice my hands shaking when I would go to reach for my toys. I didn’t realize that my hands shook until the age of four years old when I was learning to tie my shoes. From that point on, I knew that simple everyday tasks were slightly more difficult for me than they were for other kids my age. I would struggle to tie my shoes, put my hair in a ponytail, paint my nails or even color a picture. My tremors got worse with age and I began to notice that other people in my family, like my father and grandfather, had the same condition.

By the time I started high school, my ET got to the point where I started to get picked on at school. People at school would call me “shakes” and would laugh every time I would spill a drink or drop something due to my ET. It was at this point when my family and I decided that I should go see a doctor.

At the age of 14, I was diagnosed with essential tremor by Dr. Shankar Shiva Natarajan. He prescribed me medicine to help my ET, but the medicine could only do so much. The thing that I am most passionate about in my life is music and theatre, so when ET started to affect how I play guitar, how I held a microphone or how I was able to perform on a stage, I would get frustrated with myself because there was nothing I could do to control it. I got to the point where I would cry every time I went to the neurologist. Every time, he would tell me, “If you do not let your tremors bother you, they will not bother anyone else.” I took this advice and I would try to not let it affect me, but my tremor continued to affect how I viewed myself. I felt as if I was not fit to be a musician because of my condition, and the thought of that was devastating.

At my next doctor’s visit, Dr. Natarajan told me something that completely changed my perspective. He asked me, “If you could trade your ET for any other disorder, would you?” I began to ponder this question. I would not trade it for blindness, deafness, paralysis, amputation or any other physical disability. It was at this moment that I realized how truly blessed I am.

From that point on, I decided that ET is a part of my life, but it cannot dictate who I am as a person. I have made the choice to pursue music despite any difficulties I may face. Although ET has had a great impact on my life, I will continue to push through and face every challenge with a positive attitude.

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Do you want to help support students with ET during their educational journey? Make a donation to the IETF scholarship fund online.

I Can’t Be Rehabilitated from Having ET; But It Gives Me an Advantage to Helping Others

Each semester, the IETF awards four $1,000 college scholarships to students who have essential tremor through its Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund. As part of the application process, students are asked to write an essay on the topic, “how essential tremor has affected my life.” The following essay is from one of our spring 2019 scholarship recipients.

By Madison Young,
Arkansas Tech University

I turned 20 last month and read a list of 20 things every 20-year-old should know. Number 17 was “There Is No Roadmap.” That is very true. I can look back now and remember standing at certain crossroads and wondering which way to turn. Different paths have different benefits and obstacles. You can hardly see 20 yards down the path sometimes. As I look back on just a few of my turns, I realize that having essential tremor (ET) has had an impact on the choices I have made in direction, not in a negative way but an impact all the same.

Madison Young, IETF scholarship recipient

Having ET does affect my life in a variety of ways. Some tasks are simply harder than they would be if my hands and arms would just be still. Plus, when the tremors take over my body, I get a little embarrassed because everyone notices, then they try to act as if they didn’t. It seems like there is a polite protocol for noticing something different about other people.

One of the turns ET has led me to make is my field of study in college. I am a rehabilitation science major planning on moving into physical therapy. Unlike people I will eventually treat/help, I can’t be rehabilitated from having ET. But it certainly causes me to relate. It gives me an advantage to helping others over someone who has never had an obstacle to overcome. I understand to some extent what it is like to be viewed as different.

In all of my classes we talk about people with disabilities, and the main point always made is most people have disabilities, but not always visible disabilities. We are all “disabled” in our own way. Some disabilities you notice right away and some you don’t. Being diagnosed with ET at such an early age has helped me learn a lot about human nature. I just want to be able to help people live the most normal lives possible.

Currently there is no cure for ET. I am ok with that. I am at peace with who I am and ET doesn’t define me or what I can accomplish. In my classes, I am learning how to help others reach that point and just deal with the situation in a positive manner. It is an empowering feeling to be able to help someone. And when you are helping someone, and they connect with you because you aren’t perfect either, it makes it all worth it. Yes, having ET has changed my life and my path, but I believe it is for the better.

It has been almost six years since my diagnosis and I can’t help but wonder where I will be at age 26. What will I be doing and how will my tremors have progressed? While there is no roadmap, there is a road seen clearly in hindsight. I hope I always remember to look back at my turns in life that have made the difference.

* * * * * * * *

Applications are being taken for fall 2019 scholarships from the IETF.  If you are a current or incoming college student with essential tremor, complete the application on the IETF website. The application deadline is May 1, 2019.

IETF Welcomes New Executive Director

Catherine Rice webThe IETF Board of Directors announces that after 18 years of leadership, Catherine S. Rice is retiring as Executive Director of the organization.  Throughout her tenure, Cathy has increased the IETF’s reach to over 100,000 people around the world.  Cathy, along with now retired Kansas House Representative Dennis Moore, in 2010 achieved formal designation for the month of March as National Essential Tremor Awareness Month.  In the last 10 years, she has facilitated 380 free ET patient education events in cities across the U.S., educating over 35,000 people.  Cathy also established a college scholarship program for students having a diagnosis of ET, as well as an ET research grant program that has awarded $1 million, thus far, for promising ET studies conducted by medical investigators.  We cannot thank her enough for her vision, dedication, and commitment to the IETF.

Patrick photoTo continue our desire to further our mission, the Board is pleased to announce Patrick McCartney as the new IETF Executive Director, effective Aug. 17, 2015.  Patrick brings over 20 years of experience with non-profit organizations.  He most recently served as the Executive Director of the Kansas City Kansas Community College Endowment Association.  Previously, Patrick was Vice President of Marketing at the Kansas City Kansas Chamber of Commerce.  His work experience focused on board relations, fiscal management, marketing and communications, and fundraising.  Please join us in welcoming Patrick to the IETF.  With your support, we are confident that he will continue the excellence of the IETF.

One of Cathy’s passions at the IETF was to recognize the achievements of students dealing with ET.  To honor and help continue Cathy’s work with college students, the Board is pleased to announce the establishment of the Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund.  This fund will be used to award four scholarships to deserving students both in the fall and winter semesters.  For anyone wishing to recognize the dedication of Cathy, the Board encourages donations to this fund, in her honor.  Information about the fund is available at www.essentialtremor.org/scholarships or 1-888-387-3667. Donations and/or notes to Cathy can also be mailed to IETF, C/O Catherine S. Rice Scholarship Fund, PO Box 14005, Lenexa, KS  66285-4005.