Her Acceptance of ET Built Her Confidence and Brought Empowerment

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month and throughout the month we will be shining a light on people who have essential tremor. Everyone has a story to tell. We hope that these stories will resonate with others, validating the everyday struggles people with ET feel physically and emotionally. As we shine a light on these individuals, we are shining a light on ET and raising awareness. Please share these stories with others.

Rachel’s Story.

Essential tremor (ET) is not just a condition of the elderly. Rachel is proof of that. She is only 28 years old and she has had ET since she was five.

Young but wise beyond her years, Rachel has come to terms with her ET and that acceptance has helped her.

“If you don’t accept yourself as a person with a disability and you just are negative about it and say, ‘this is it. I can’t do anything,’ then you are letting life and time pass you by,” she said. “But if you actually accept it and have that confidence and use it to your ability as a way of empowerment, then it’s something that makes life and time a lot easier.”

Rachel has made it a priority to raise awareness about ET. As a communication major in college, she used ET as her platform when she gave speeches and produced videos. She captured ET through photography and worked on individual and group projects. She saw it as an opportunity to let people know that ET exists and explained the impact it has on people of all ages. She even agreed to be the subject of a documentary film her friend Debra produced. Titled, ShakeItUp! it can still be viewed online today through YouTube.

NETA month 2019 Logo

But, Rachel didn’t stop there. She went on to reach out to people all over the world through Facebook support groups, and maintains a presence in more than 30 groups today. She started a blog where she wrote about ET, and her social media posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter frequently mentioned her challenges and struggles. More than anything, she focused on helping people understand what ET is.

“People know what Parkinson’s disease is so I use that as a point of reference to say, if you know what a resting tremor is with Parkinson’s, then think about the reverse of that. ET is the action tremor,” she explained.

Rachel became co-leader of an essential tremor support group in her community and then took the reins as leader when her co-leader moved.

She estimates she has reached over a thousand people through her awareness efforts.

“I try to take any opportunity I can to be able to share my story,” Rachel said. “It also helps me. It’s a form of talk therapy and you never know who you are reaching.”