Running to Make an Impact

The location was the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Second Class Petty Officer Peder Nelson had just finished his shift as a block guard at the detention facility. It was his first 90 days on the island and there was a “no alcohol consumption” policy in place for everyone working there. As he filled out a log sheet, a senior officer was watching, and approached Peder. Then the inquiry began.

“When was your last drink?” he asked.

Taken aback, Peder realized the officer had noticed his shaky hands. It was an educational moment for the officer as Peder explained that his shaky hands were not related to alcohol withdrawal, but rather a condition called essential tremor (ET).

Peder Nelson photo
Peder Nelson with his son, Davin.

This type of assumption is all too common for people with ET. Alcoholism, drug abuse and nervousness top the list of assumptions people make when they see someone’s shaky hands, head or limbs – all symptoms of ET. Because of this, people afflicted often try to hide it. They feel self-conscious, sometimes embarrassed, and often they let it inhibit them. Peder has felt all of these emotions and more.

But this fall, the 39-year-old Navy veteran from Sellersburg, IN will push past his ET, while raising awareness to the public. Peder will compete in the 6th annual Cloudsplitter 100 set for October 12-13. Cloudsplitter is a 100-mile ultramarathon taking place in the heart of Central Appalachia in the Cumberland Mountains of Virginia.

Throughout his training and his running, he will be raising money for the International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF). Peder has set up a FundRazr site where people can make pledges to sponsor him. So far, he has raised about $2,000.

Peder has dealt with ET most of his life, but was formally diagnosed at age 20. He saw his diagnosis as a weakness and decided to get in shape. So he began running. What many don’t realize is that exercise actually make tremors temporarily worsen, but for Peder it’s worth it.

“Exercise is a really good way to feel confident about something and to feel competent about something,” Peder said.

Cloudsplitter participants are allowed 40 hours to complete the 100-mile race course. The record holder for the course did it in 22 hours. Peder expects to finish somewhere between 22 and 40 hours.

Added to the 100-mile challenge, the course will include elevation changes totaling 52,000 feet, along with rugged terrain, which includes crossing water in some areas. He will have help toward the end of the race. Many family members and friends have volunteered to “pace” him. This means they will run alongside him and cheer him on and provide that mental support needed to keep going as he gets closer to the end. He expects to be running on adrenaline that last part of the race, once the physical exhaustion sets in and lack of sleep takes its toll.

These thoughts might hinder someone else, but Peder is up to the challenge. It will be his time to shine a light on essential tremor.

Visit Peder’s FundRazr page online to learn more or to pledge your support. Or donate through through the IETF website.

Shine a Light on Essential Tremor

“Be the light that helps others see.” Anonymous

By Tammy Dodderidge
IETF Marketing and Communications Manager

Just when we thought we had heard every symptom and every challenge associated with essential tremor, we realized we were wrong. When we reached out to the essential tremor community last month and asked people to share their stories as part of National Essential Tremor Awareness Month (NETA), we received a number of responses. People sent us moving accounts of their diagnoses and their challenges. The stories are insightful and emotional, mixed with both sadness and hope. Most importantly, they are REAL.

Logo for NETA Month 2019We will be sharing these stories on this blog site throughout the month of March. Our goal is to “shine a light on essential tremor,” which is the theme for this year’s NETA Month campaign. We know when we shine our light, we heighten awareness and brighten hope. We connect people so they don’t feel alone, and empower them to speak up and educate others.

Here’s a sampling of the personal stories we will be sharing through this Tremor Talk blog site during March:

The Story of Anna. Anna thought being pushed out of a tree when she was 10 years old is what caused her tremor to begin. Growing up, she would shake her leg to try to disguise her tremor as nervousness. There have been times throughout her life when she has felt like a “freak” because of her ET.

The Story of Lucy. Lucy is an 84-year-old widow with essential tremor “everywhere.” She was actually able to hide it from her husband until he passed away. She struggled to find a doctor who would diagnosis and treat her.

The Story of Jody. Jody works two jobs so she works seven days a week. She has learned to make accommodations for her tremor. Some days her muscles hurt and her whole body hurts, but she is thankful she can still move.

The Story of Rachel. Diagnosed at age 5, Rachel has made it one of her goals in life to raise awareness to ET any way she can. From creating videos, to making presentations to being an ET Support Group leader, she is not giving up hope that someday there will be a cure for ET.

There are many other stories as well. The mission of the IETF is to provide HOPE to people with ET through awareness, education, support and research. March is our biggest time to shine a light on ET, and we hope you will join us by taking part in some way.

Be sure to take a look at our webpage where we have shared our NETA Month posters, banners and other materials, as well as ideas. Make a donation to receive an NETA Month t-shirt and tote bag, which will help raise awareness all year long. And stay tuned to this blog site to share your own comments and stories.