Where has my button been? Join in the fun!

ZoomButtonwithTitleThumbWe’re always looking for fresh ways to bring essential tremor into greater public consciousness. In this high-tech age, we have all sorts of digital solutions, but for our latest effort, we’ve gone decidedly old-school: a simple one-inch button that you pin on your lapel (or wherever you like!). The button features the same Archimedes spiral that is used by movement disorders neurologists to help diagnose essential tremor and that is also seen in the IETF logo.

Based on anecdotal evidence from those of us at the IETF headquarters who’ve worn them out and about, the handsome, bright-green spiral has proven to be a fine conversation starter. During March, for National Essential Tremor Awareness Month, we distributed more than 2,500 of these must-have accessories. They are free and we will be using them all year long to raise awareness about ET.

Join in the fun on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/InternationalEssentialTremorFoundation where people will be sporting their spiral buttons and engaging in Where has my button been? activities. Several of my ET friends in Houston and I posted the first picture on Facebook to commemorate my button’s inaugural visit to Houston for the ET Education Seminar.

You may order your button through our webstore at http://www.essentialtremor.org/SiteResources/Modules/webstore/scripts/default.asp or by calling our toll-free number 888.387.3667. Order a few extra to share with friends, and expand the circle of button-wearers! Let’s see how many different and exotic places these stylish buttons (with their owners!) travel. So please, tell us–and show us–where has your button been?

If asked about the button, you can sound very worldly and educated:

▪ Tell them that the spiral is named after the Greek mathematician Archimedes (287-212 BC);

▪ Tell them that asking a patient to draw an Archimedes spiral is one of the indicators physicians have for diagnosing essential tremor;

▪ Tell them that for millions of people worldwide, the spiral represents hope for a better future;

▪ Ask them to join you in supporting efforts to raise awareness and funds to find better treatments and a cure.

 

 

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